Hagia Sophia Mosaics

Alexander Panel

Alexander Mosaic of Hagia Sophia

It is said that Emperor Alexander (870-913) was one of the worst Byzantine Emperors. He would make pagan sacrifices to cure his impotence. He died of a stroke during a polo game.

His mosaic (Alexander Panel) probably dates to 912. In the mosaic, he was depicted unaccompanied with his red crown and ornate red boots with pearls holding an orb in his right hand and an akakia (a cylindrical purple silk roll containing dust, symbolizing the mortal nature of men) in his left hand. He wears a royal garment a sagion and a skoramargion. We see him in his older ages.

In the mosaic, there are four inscriptions, three of which are cruciform monograms and one of which reads Alexander.

Emperor Alexander Mosaic in Hagia Sophia, Photo Credit Dumbarton Oaks

Emperor Alexander Mosaic in Hagia Sophia, Photo Credit Dumbarton Oaks


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hagiasophiatr

Hagia Sophia Research Team (HSRT) consists of a group of people who likes to research Byzantine Heritage in Turkey by visiting and taking photos of the historical places.

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